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Incarcerated Workers Among Hardest Hit By Wildfires

By: Shaina Smith, Community Organizing Intern Massive wildfires fuelled by climate change have damaged millions of acres across California, Oregon, and Washington over the past few weeks. Some parts of California have an AQI of over 700. Air Quality Index (AQI) measures air pollution on a scale of 0-500. Any [...]

By |September 23rd, 2020|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Incarcerated Workers Among Hardest Hit By Wildfires

Please Stop Screaming – Let’s Listen To One Another

Recently, I’ve been discussing presidential politics, as all of us have. Even if you try to avoid the conversations and the different opinions, they are everywhere on the news, in the paper, among your colleagues and friends. Such conversations are important, and often even helpful, to educate people on issues.  [...]

By |September 16th, 2020|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Please Stop Screaming – Let’s Listen To One Another

The Life of an Intern at CHEJ

By Sophie Weinberg, CHEJ Science Intern, Summer 2020. This summer was unusual to say the least. Despite living through a pandemic, people around the world innovated their lives to create a new normal. One of these changes included working remotely. This posed a unique challenge to the entire workforce, but [...]

By |September 2nd, 2020|Tags: , , |Comments Off on The Life of an Intern at CHEJ

Systemic Racism In Urban Environments & Our Future

By: Sharon Franklin Children play near an oil refinery in Los Angeles, California. Photo Credit: Etienne Laurent / EPA   Dr. Jake M. Robinson PhD Researcher, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffiel, South Yorkshire, England recently published an article in The Conversation entitled “How Racism and Classism Affect Natural Ecosystems”. In [...]

By |August 26th, 2020|Comments Off on Systemic Racism In Urban Environments & Our Future

Residential Segregation and Disproportionate Exposure to Airborne Carcinogens

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis published a paper late last year that found carcinogens present in the air of the St. Louis metropolitan area to be highly concentrated in Black and poor neighborhoods. They found that approximately 14% of the census tracks in the city had elevated cancer [...]

By |August 19th, 2020|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Residential Segregation and Disproportionate Exposure to Airborne Carcinogens

Remembering the Anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

By Sophie Weinberg, Intern Last week marked the 75th anniversary of the two bombings that changed the course of the world, Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Not only did these two bombings obliterate the populations of two Japanese cities, but they also still impose lasting health effects on those residents. Thousands of [...]

By |August 12th, 2020|Comments Off on Remembering the Anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Unequal Infant Mortality Rate Caused by Environmental Injustice

By Monica Lee, Communications & Development Intern Children are oftentimes more vulnerable to the negative effects of environmental injustice. This is because their bodies have not been fully developed to face the harsh health impacts from their environment. Nonetheless, according to the National Vital Statistics Reports done by the CDC, [...]

By |August 6th, 2020|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Unequal Infant Mortality Rate Caused by Environmental Injustice

Studies Suggest Air Pollution Increases Threat of Coronavirus Airborne Transmission

By: Shaina Smith, Community Organizing Intern The reality of environmental inequality is that industry polluters target low-wealth and minority communities disproportionately. A 2018 study found that Black and Latino people are typically exposed to 56% and 63% more air pollution than is caused by their consumption, but that white people [...]

By |July 30th, 2020|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Studies Suggest Air Pollution Increases Threat of Coronavirus Airborne Transmission
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