BPA

Recent Studies State Chemical In Plastic Liquid Containers Contain Tox

For BPA, Does the Dose Make the Poison?

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For those who keep up with environmental health research and chemical regulations, it is no surprise to come across conflicting reports on the safety or risk of various compounds. This week, in the case of the compound bisphenol A (BPA), these conflicting reports happened to emerge almost simultaneously. On January 21st, the European Food Safety Authority declared that BPA “poses no health risk to consumers of any age group…at current exposure levels.” The next day, a study published in the journal PLoS Genetics showed that even low and short-term exposures to BPA and other hormone-mimicking compounds could alter stem cells and lead to lower sperm counts.

BPA is a common ingredient in plastics used for food and drink containers. Its hormone-like properties allow it to disrupt the endocrine system, with potential health effects ranging from reproductive issues to cancer. Though BPA has been banned in baby bottles in the U.S., and BPA-free products have become widely available since concerns about the compound were first raised in 2008, it remains in products from water bottles to the inside coatings of cans.

David McNew via Getty Images

‘The dose makes the poison’ is a well-known adage in toxicology, implying that even hazardous chemicals can be harmless at low enough concentrations. However, decades of research have shown this to be an overly simplistic way of analyzing toxic exposures.  Dr. Theo Colborn, who passed away on December 14th, 2014, was a pioneering researcher in the field of endocrine disruption and a tireless advocate for precautionary chemical regulation. Her research on endocrine disruption demonstrated that even very low concentrations of harmful chemicals could result in changes to the reproductive system, particularly in developing babies and children who have less of a tolerance for exposure than adults. She also demonstrated that not all effects of toxic chemicals are immediately apparent, but can occur decades and even generations later.

The study published last week focused on both questions of concentration and timing. The researchers tested estrogenic compounds including BPA on mice, and found that they alter the stem cells, or undifferentiated cells, which are responsible for sperm production later in life. Patricia Hunt, the researcher who led the study, told Environmental Health News that exposure to even low doses of estrogens “is not simply affecting sperm being produced now, but impacting the stem cell population, and that will affect sperm produced throughout the lifetime.”

Uncertainties remain in the wake of this study. For instance, the researchers are still investigating whether the changes observed can cross generations, or whether the same changes can occur in human reproductive stem cells. The EFSA also recognized uncertainties in non-dietary sources of BPA, and they are still conducting long-term studies in rats. While scientists and regulators continue to chase answers, this past week shines a spotlight on the complicated realm of environmental health risk assessment, and shows the continued relevance of Dr. Theo Colborn’s work and legacy. Dose is indeed important in making a poison, but so is timing of exposure, and time itself in revealing the chronic and transgenerational effects of chemicals.

mouse

One study finds BPA linked to changes in stem cells, while another declares it safe

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Environmental Health News reports on a study that shows BPA and other estrogenic compounds may affect stem cell development in mice. Writes Brian Bienkowski, “The study, published in PLoS Genetics, is the first to suggest that low, brief exposures to bisphenol-A, or other estrogens such as those used in birth control but found as water contaminants, early in life can alter the stem cells responsible for producing sperm later in life.” Read more here.

Another study, from the European food safety authority, has recently declared BPA as not a considerable health risk. Says NBC News, “The European Food Safety Authority’s review of BPA shows that people in general – from babies to the elderly – are not getting enough BPA in their systems to harm their health. But it says more research is needed it some areas, such as exposure from cash register receipts.Read more here.

A complicated picture emerges, but perhaps BPA is an instance of a chemical that poses few immediate risks, but can alter health in the future.

Companies used BPS as a safe alternative to BPA. (David McNew/Getty Images)

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, is tied to hyperactivity, study says

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In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Companies used BPS as a safe alternative to BPA. (David McNew/Getty Images)

Read more from Amy Ellis Nutt at The Washington Post.

pvcflooring3

Global PVC Floor Industry Report 2014

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The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The PVC floor market analysis is provided for the international markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status.

Development policies and plans are also discussed and manufacturing processes and cost structures analyzed. PVC floor industry import/export consumption, supply and demand figures and cost price and production value gross margins are also provided. Get the full report here.

http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mcwhitn/global_pvc_floor_industry_report_2014

vomsaal

BPA and Health: New Research Focuses on Routes of Exposure

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The health impacts of exposure to BPA, an endocrine disrupting environmental contaminant, continue to be much discussed in the environmental health field, as well as amongst consumers concerned about safer choices for themselves and their families. Additionally, the means by which people are exposed to contaminants such as BPA also continue to be researched.  A new study in PLOS One, authored by endocrinologist Frederick vom Saal, reports that touching thermal receipt paper after using hand sanitizer can increase the amount of BPA transferred from thermal paper to hands and then absorbed by the skin 100-fold. This elevated level of exposure to BPA has concerning implications for people’s health, as BPA is associated with a wide-range of developmental abnormalities as well as other diseases in adults.

A second review by Dr. vom Saal (Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology) discusses approaches being used by regulatory agencies to claim that levels of unconjugated (bioactive) serum BPA, as reported in dozens of human biomonitoring studies, can be ignored. Data from these studies suggest that exposures to BPA must be occurring from multiple sources and that these exposures must be factored into risk assessments.

This half-hour teleconference call is one in a monthly series sponsored by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment’s EDC Strategies Group.The CHE EDC Strategies Group is chaired by Carol Kwiatkowski (TEDX), Sharyle Patton (Commonweal), and Genon Jensen (HEAL).

Featured speaker:

Dr. Frederick vom Saal is a professor of reproductive biology in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Missouri – Columbia. He has published more than 140 articles concerning the effects of exposure during fetal life to natural hormones, and both man made and naturally occurring endocrine disrupting chemicals


Additional calls in this series include:

1/8/14: Endocrine Disruption and Immune Dysfunction

2/19/14: Endocrine Disruption of the Neuro-immune Interface

3/19/14: Effects of Prenatal Exposures to EDCs on Childhood Development

4/16/14: How the Next Generation’s Brain Functions are Endangered by EDCs and Other Environmental Chemicals

5/21/14: Retha Newbold Speaks About CLARITY-BPA: A Novel Approach to Study Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

6/18/14: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

9/17/14: Maternal Bisphenol A Programs Offspring Metabolic Syndrome

10/15/14: Cold Feet: Perinatal DDT Exposure Increases Risk of Insulin Resistance


From the Collaborative on Health and the Environment.

PVC pipe

Residents Sue National Pipe (PVC) NY

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Nearly 50 Endicott, NY residents have banded together in a lawsuit filed last week against National Pipe & Plastics, accusing the manufacturer of having “devastated the neighborhood” where it opened a new plant earlier this year.  The lawsuit claims noise and odors wafting from the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe manufacturing plant at 15 Mills Ave. have created an “ongoing public nuisance” to residents of the West Endicott neighborhood.

Read more.

Human exposure to BPA can come from water bottles and food containers.

EPA Adds 23 Chemicals, Including BPA, to Key List for Scrutiny, Possible Action

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On October 23rd, the EPA added 23 chemicals, including BPA, seven phthalates and two flame retardants to a key list of chemicals that may be subject to stricter regulation.

Human exposure to BPA can come from water bottles and food containers.

The chemicals on this list all have properties that make them particularly hazardous, whether they are used in children’s products, have been linked to cancer, or are particularly environmentally persistent.

The EPA also removed 15 chemicals from the list.

Read the full story at Bloomberg News.

Credit: Anthony Berenyi | Shutterstock

BPA Exposure During Pregnancy Linked to Lung Problems in Children

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A new study reports that children of women who are exposed to BPA during pregnancy may face an increased risk of lung problems. Read more from Agata Blaszczak-Boxe at LiveScience.com

Credit: Anthony Berenyi | Shutterstock


PVC pipe

Global PVC Market 2014-2018

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Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is one of the most widely used plastics across the world. Properties such as lightweight, high mechanical strength, abrasion resistance, and toughness make PVC a widely used material in the Construction, Packaging, Automotive, and Electrical industries.

PVC is widely used in consumer products and building. Image from iplasticsupply.com


PVC is extensively used in many products, such as pipes and fittings, rigid films, rigid plates, cables and wires, flooring, automotive parts, and packaging. It has an excellent cost to performance ratio, and hence, it is very popular among all consumer segments.

For more information please click on:  http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mw88f4j/global_pvc_market_20142018

Photo by Ashley L. Conti | Bangor Daily News

Chemical safety advocacy group protests against LePage in Bangor

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Photo by Ashley L. Conti | Bangor Daily News

A 25-foot-long yellow inflatable duck has been drawing attention to chemical regulation in Bangor, Maine. The “Fear the Beard” campaign was launched by members of Prevent Harm, a public health political advocacy group, to protest against Governor Paul LePage’s history of lax chemical regulation. The name of the campaign stems from LePage’s comments in 2011 that the worst possible impacts from BPA would be that some women “may have little beards” – a reference to the chemical’s endocrine-disrupting properties, which may cause effects ranging from cancer to infertility.


“We’re out here today with our little beards [on sticks] to make sure that our next governor will put Maine kids ahead of the chemical industry, not the other way around,” Emma Halas-O’Connor, Prevent Harm advocacy manager, said.

Read more from Nok-Noi Ricker at Bangor Daily News.